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Rae's Latest

Filtering by Tag: Recording

Behind the Scenes: New Photos

Rae Hering

I absolutely love how these new photos turned out! First of all, Chad McClarnon is a wizard with all things having to do with a camera - thank you for the amazing photos, Chad! Next, thank you to Glen Weiss of 1087 Studios for the great space to do the shoot!

As you guys probably know, I’m such a thrift store addict! I had fun going through my closet and pairing together my latest finds along with a few from friends. What I ended up with are definitely clothes that I felt the most “me” in! 

I love this sheer mini-floret sleeveless top. For me it’s that perfect go-to summer piece. I feel 10x more FUN in this outfit!

Thanks to my fellow thrifter, Trista McClarnon (pst...watch for her new vintage online store opening soon called Jean Eileen!), I got to sport this outrageously wild leopard sweater! There are no words to how funky cool this thing is.

Have you ever had a clothing item you put on and you feel invincible in? Yeah, that’s this leather jacket by Gryphon.  It’s the perfect tan color that goes with everything and fits just right. HANDS DOWN it's my favorite find from Designer Renaissance - I LOVE this place, you gotta check ‘em out!

I’m on a mission to bring the hat back! Hats add such unique style and character to a look. I lucked out and found this Goorin Bros emerald-colored hat at Buffalo Exchange

Most importantly, I think these photos reflect the sound of my upcoming “Live at Pentavarit” song series in images (well, if that can even be done, we’ve done it!) The new songs were recorded, as the name suggests, live in a trio setting. We didn’t do any fancy sound layering, and it wasn’t a lengthy teeth-pulling process. The songs were recorded with exactly what they needed, no more, no less. I think these photos achieve the same goal. They really show me, wearing clothes that feel like me…just simple, and just right.

Album artwork Unveiling!

Rae Hering

Soooo excited to present to you all the new album artwork for "The Shy Gemini Sessions!"

     Back cover                                                                                    Front cover

     Back cover                                                                                    Front cover

Thanks to my friend and very talented artist Chris Longs, "The Shy Gemini Sessions" now has a visual story to go with the music.  What's extra super duper cool is that everything on the artwork has significance relating to the music.

The two sketches of me on the front and back covers are inspired by the Greek Gemini twins Castor and Pollux.  The significance of the gemini is that we recorded each song in two different ways - full band and acoustic to show the varying sides of my artistry.  

The canyon not only represents the song "Canyon," but it also runs in between Castor and Pollux, both connecting and dividing the gemini twins, showing they are the same yet very different.

The instruments represent the trio that made the heartbeat of this album pump.  Jerry Roe on drums and Ernest Chapman on bass are the definition of badassery + creative genius.  

The infinity symbol on the drum set is there because this theme runs heavily throughout the project.  In fact, the album begins with the song "Infinity" and ends with "Endless" (if you can call that an end?)  We could probably psychoanalyze why I'm obsessed with the unknown unending abyss, but then again, who isn't?

Finally, the album cover is actually a watercolor painting inspired by the song "Watercolor."  I love how Chris left the canvas showing on the edges.  To me the painting looks intentionally unfinished in this way.  Chris is showing the process of its formation; what's lying underneath, undone.  Even the Castor and Pollux gemini sketches are undone looking because, well, they're literally quick rough sketches.  I fell in love with them so much that Chris decided to use them in the real artwork.  

This idea of being in the process, unfinished and undone, couldn't be more telling of the personal place I'm coming from with recording this album.  We are all works in progress...

Anyhow, can't wait to share with you the MUSIC!!  Coming soon!

  

FIREBREATHRECORDS HOUSE SHOW #3 - RAE HERING /MAY 22, 2014

Rae Hering

Reblogged from FirebreathRecords:

Hey everyone!  Ford here.  Our next house show has been announced for Friday, May 30th.  It is $5 at the door and completely FREE online!  If you are outside of Nashville you can watch the show here.  

To help you get to know the performing artists before the show, we are asking them 4 simple questions.  First up is Rae Hering!

 

FBR:  Have you ever played a house show before?

Rae: Yep, a few. I love them. It's such an up-close, intimate experience for the performers and the audience members alike. They're a great way to support independent artists and have a really unique encounter with the arts at the same time.

FBR:  What makes you most excited about the show on the 30th?

Rae:  I'm excited to be playing with some really talented, inclusive, creative, pro-active and community-oriented musicians and friends of mine!

FBR:  What do you think of live streaming as a way to watch concerts and interact with fans?

Rae:  As recorded music is becoming de-valued (down to 99 cents that is!), live music performance is becoming a valuable commodity. People are craving interactive, one-of-a-kind experiences more and more. Live streaming is an excellent way to make these one-of-a-kind performances accessible to many.

FBR:  Tell us your deepest, darkest secret....or a fun fact!

Rae:  Fun fact: I can touch my tongue to my nose...just sayin'

Don't forget to FOLLOW us on twitter at @FRBRTHrecords and LIKE us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/firebreathrecords 

Engagement - Isn't That a Warfare Term?

Rae Hering

A year ago, I got engaged to my fiancé, Jonathan.  We were uncharacteristically sitting at a hooka bar when he told me that when I was ready, he would marry me, “no matter if it’s one year from now, five years, ten years, or even twenty.”  (Insert SWOON!) I couldn’t believe what had just happened.  For a few days I existed inside a surreal bubble filled with love, rainbows, lemonade and big red balloons (Jonathan was like, “does this imaginary happy place really have to be a little kid carnival?  This is kind of creepy.” And I was like, “YEP.  Live with it, sucker!  You’re mine now!”)  I have never been more elated in my life.

DSC09176
DSC09176

And then the buzz kill came when I told my parents.

I imagine a day many years from now when I’ll be able to fully appreciate the parallel between my life and the countless comedy films with “wedding” and “parents” in the storyline.  But right now, things are still a little raw.  Basically, my huge Life Step marched right onto a land mine.  My engagement triggered all the hidden issues my family and I had been ignoring.

I spent a good half a year convincing myself I was A-OK and that I wasn’t freaking out about planning a wedding.  But the more I tried to please people who weren’t excited about us getting married in the first place, the more I realized I was practically half naked seeing how much I had completely unraveled.  I love my parents dearly and I know the love is reciprocated, but man, it’s been a tough year.

Brawling my Brains Out
Brawling my Brains Out

One of my good friends told me that engagement is one of the happiest times I’ll ever have, and to relish it.  But bawling my brains out was no way to spend the happiest time of my life.  So I decided to seek help through a therapist.

The second half of my engagement year has been a slow uphill climb in learning how to separate my happiness from the fulfillment from my parents’ expectations.  And I can say with confidence that my parents are working towards coming to terms with how I’ve chosen a different path than the one they envisioned for me.

Now I want to show you the illustration that inspired this blog post.  My talented and impossibly sweet friend Chris Longs is doing the album artwork for my forthcoming double EP, “The Shy Gemini Sessions.”  It’s still a work in progress, but he sent me this as a preliminary sketch.  I fell in love with it immediately.

Dark Cloud Sketch
Dark Cloud Sketch

When I look at this illustration, it feels as though I’m looking at my reflection for the first time in a very, very long time.  It’s as though I have been wandering through a world without mirrors, unable to truly see the person I have become until suddenly, now, I encounter myself again.  There I am!

Puzzle piece
Puzzle piece

I can’t stop staring at it.  I’m incomplete and scattered, but my lines are formed and that’s all I really need. I don’t need to be whole right now, I just need to be in the process.

Going through this tumultuous engagement year, I’ve lost perspective, composure and a little bit of sanity, too.  Thank goodness for music though.  I was able to inject my emotions into the songs that turned into “The Shy Gemini Sessions.”  And now, here I am, on the other side, looking at who I’ve become.  A rough sketch, but I think it’s turning out beautifully.

Going for the Imperfect Vocal Take

Rae Hering

Having a good laugh at Brown Owl Studios in Nashville, TN.
Having a good laugh at Brown Owl Studios in Nashville, TN.

Lately, when I've been recording vocals for my new EP "The Shy Gemini Sessions," one of the most challenging things is to get The Imperfect Take. (uh...what now??...Imperfect?)  Yep, the "perfect take" is NOT what I'm looking for.  Instead, I want an emotional take, a moving take, a vulnerable take, and most likely that's not the prettiest or most perfect one of the batch.

In the vocal booth at Destiny Studios in Nashville, TN.
In the vocal booth at Destiny Studios in Nashville, TN.

It's a tough choice to keep making because, who doesn't want to come off all nice and polished, right?  But the thing is, Imperfection is just downright more interesting!  Ever notice that your significant other prefers the candid photo with that true-to-self, unprepared expression on your face?  You thought that you looked better in the shot with the nicely-placed and practiced smile, but that candid shot captures something about your essence that the well-rehearsed one just doesn't.

Lost in a song at Brown Owl Studios in Nashville, TN.
Lost in a song at Brown Owl Studios in Nashville, TN.

When I find myself picking apart and polishing up my vocals, it's helpful to listen back to singers that I personally love.  Dave Matthews, Tom Waits and Rufus Wainwright may not be technically "superb" singers, but I'll listen to these characteristic voices over auto-tuned vocals any day!

Interestingly, even our health depends on living in an Imperfect environment.  If we over-sanitize our homes, we can become more susceptible to disease because we're not giving our bodies the chance to build up immunities.  This is a good reminder that I need to let my music live in an Imperfect space and to not over-sanitize my recordings.

Recording the Yamaha CP 70 at Brown Owl Studios in Nashville, TN.
Recording the Yamaha CP 70 at Brown Owl Studios in Nashville, TN.

The ultimate goal, of course, is to balance raw emotion with tempered technique.  To combine character with culture and intuitive flow with well-practiced poise.  But the temptation (for me at least) is to smooth over too many edges.

To be human is to be Imperfect.  To be Imperfect is to be relatable.  To be relatable is to connect with others.  So, I choose to embrace my Imperfections because I believe this will allow me to move, excite, provoke and engage - my hope is that this will shine through on my new recording project, "The Shy Gemini Sessions."

P.S. - Thanks to Ernest Chapman (bass), Jerry Roe (drums), Bobby Holland (sound engineer/producer), Mark Zellmer (Brown Owl Studio), and Jonathan Morse (creative director).

Bobby Holland (left)  and Mark Zellmer (right).
Bobby Holland (left) and Mark Zellmer (right).
Jerry Roe on drums
Jerry Roe on drums
Jonathan Morse
Jonathan Morse
Ernest Chapman on bass
Ernest Chapman on bass